Recent market trends in Slough

It is of no doubt that Slough is a large city in Berkshire, England, on the western fringes of Greater London, 7 miles (11 km) east of Maidenhead, 12 miles (19 km) southeast of High Wycombe 20 miles (32 km) west of central London, 3 miles (5 km) north of Windsor, and 21 miles (34 km) northeast of the county seat of Reading. Sitting at the entrance between the Thames Valley and London and at the intersection of the M4, M40 and M25 motorways, it offers easy road access to the rest of the United Kingdom.

The Great Western Main Line that pass through the city, which historically was part of the neighboring Buckinghamshire. Starting in 2019, the Elizabeth line (Crossrail) will allow quick trips to central London.

 

Medieval Windsor castle in Berkshire, England.
Windsor, England – August 4, 2013: Windsor Castle is a royal residence at Windsor in the English county of Berkshire

 

Recently, It is obvious that Slough is hailed as a “main place” for jobs, cost of living and worker satisfaction in the research conducted by the Glass door job site. The recent survey of the employment site Glass door shows that Slough has become one of the 25 best towns and cities to live and work, surpassing Manchester and Cambridge among the first three.

However, even so, tenaciously, the negative image persists. Therefore, its beleaguered citizens will certainly not be surprised by the findings of a survey by HireScores.com (“the only review site of recruitment agencies in the United Kingdom”, no less) that claim that Slough is the workplace less kind of the United Kingdom.

The survey says that only 12% of respondents believe that Slough is “a nice place to work.” Now their is no doubt that Hire Scores uses the most stringent empirical methodology in its survey collection techniques, but it’s a bit skeptical about how a sample of only 1,587 members of the British public, of whom 1,276 are currently in employment, can produce results of this nature.

The headquarters for brands such as Mars and O2 are based there. Apart from this, the city is also the scene of the former sitcom The Office, about a fictional paper company in a dusty industrial estate. Swindon and Stoke-on Trent were fourth and fifth in the study, respectively.

Apparently, Nancy Lalor of the Slough Chamber of Commerce reaction shows that she is not surprised by the study: the Slough Chamber of Commerce has so many central offices that are located in Slough, so many corporations and an incredible commercial park with more than 350 businesses at. “There are so many new constructions, so much development in the city, every few months the whole aspect of the city is changing and I think people are inspired by what is happening.” She said

Last year, the majority of property sales in Slough involved flats that sold for an average of £ 237,989. The attached properties were sold for an average price of £ 347,955, while the attached properties reached £ 415,762.

Slough, with an overall average price of £ 343,951, was similar in terms of prices sold to nearby Wexham (£ 351,860), but was more expensive than Cippenham (£ 323,553) and cheaper than Eton (£ 452,143).

During the past year, the prices sold in Slough were 7% more than the previous year and 20% more than in 2015 when the average price of the house was £ 280,000

Slough was among the areas of the country with the highest price hikes this year. The city of Berkshire, ridiculed as an industrial wasteland by the 20th century poet, experienced increases of almost 20 percent.

Conclusively, this article has shown us the real positive market trends in Slough as the city is a focus for competitive investors around the globe. However 2018 has taken started very slow and seems like there shall be dip in the market. Rentals properties have seen a decline in the monthly rents, this most likely due to the fact that there are a huge amount of properties available to rent and any potential tenant will have choice of property.

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